Zimbabwe

Doctor examining a HIV patient at Newlands Clinic in Harare.

INTEREST Conference: Hypertension Care

Our research team at Newlands Clinic examined how Hypertension is prevailed and treated in Zambia and Zimbabwe. The study showed that many adults are suffering from the condition. Hypertension has a bad impact on heart and blood vessels health. Our team presented its findings at the INTEREST conference in Kampala, Uganda.

Hypertension Care Cascade

more...
Nurse taking blood from a HIV patient at Newlands Clinic in Zimbabwe.

INTEREST Conference: Mortality Causes

Our team examined changes in mortality between 2010 and 2020 at Newlands Clinic. While fewer deaths from infectious diseases occurred, the ones from non-communicable diseases, and malignancies increased. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis, and early treatment get more crucial preventing early deaths. Our team presented the poster at the INTEREST conference in Kampala, Uganda.

Mortality Causes Newlands Clinic

more...

2021 Annual Report

Newlands Clinic is treating more than 7,000 patients with HIV. Thanks to our donors, we kept our doors open despite the corona pandemic. Read now what kept us busy during the past year.

2021 Annual Report

Dr Celophas Chimbetete training healthcare workers in HIV management at Newlands Clinic in Harare.

Training Calendar 2022

Are you interested in HIV management training? Gain valuable knowledge for your professional development as a healthcare worker. Check out our training calendar 2022 or join our online training in February. For more information, click here or contact our training coordinator.


Training Calendar 2022
Online Training February

Study: Linkage, HIV and cancer

Our research team examined cancer diagnoses among people living with HIV at Newlands Clinic. The most common cancer types were those related to infections. They found that vaccination, regular screening, and starting HIV treatment early, before the immune system is severely weakened, may help prevent cancer among people living with HIV in Zimbabwe.

more...

Anniversary Training Center

Ten years ago, we opened with the support from the Bernhart-Matter-Stiftung our Newlands Clinic Training Center. More than 7 000 doctors and health care workers participated in our training courses in HIV/Aids management. Together we are continuing to share our lifesaving knowledge with local professionals and to expand our training offers. For example, with our new course format such as online training.

COVID-19 Effects and Response: A Gendered Perspective

The COVID-19 pandemic has and continues to have distressing impacts on every sphere of life in communities across the globe. However, women and girls have arguably been disproportionately affected (Brookings, 2020). As with most complex public health emergencies, the gender disparities of the pandemic pose a threat to exacerbating pre-existing inequalities particularly in resource limited countries (WANEP, 2020). This paper highlights the health, economic, social, and educational costs on African women and girls in the ongoing pandemic and makes possible recommendations for effective engagement.

more...
covid-19 screening, clinic, medical staff, patient

Update: Situation at Newlands Clinic Coronavirus

While coronavirus is still dominating the world, Newlands Clinic is keeping its safety measures in place to minimize the infection risk as much as possible. Read all about the latest developments.

more...
tuberculosis, research, zimbabwe, hiv, aids, ruedi luethy foundation, newlands clinic, actagainstaids, abstract, science, conference

Tuberculosis prevention research

Our pharmacist Tinashe Mudzviti compared therapies for people with HIV/Aids to prevent an infection with Tuberculosis because they are at an increased risk. We screen all our patients at each consultation. He and his fellow researchers Samuel Makhaza and Samuel Gavi summed up the results in an abstrac and presented it in a virtual conference on how to bridge the gap between tuberculosis research and the policy in Zimbabwe.

Abstract Makhaza S, Gavi S and Mudzviti T